Neurosphere

The Human-Human Interface

More Support Infrastructure


Personal Infrastructure

“In a patent application, an Austin-based startup called EEStor promised “technologies for replacement of electrochemical batteries,” meaning a motorist could plug in a car for five minutes and drive 500 miles roundtrip between Dallas and Houston without gasoline. EEStor’s secret ingredient is a material sandwiched between thousands of wafer-thin metal sheets, like a series of foil-and-paper gum wrappers stacked on top of each other. Charged particles stick to the metal sheets and move quickly across EEStor’s proprietary material. The result is an ultracapacitor, a battery-like device that stores and releases energy quickly.”

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=3547157&page=1

tip o the neurohat to FUTUREdition from the Arlington Institute.


Even More Bionics


Personal Infrastructure

and more war.

More than 130 veterans of the Iraq war now face the daunting challenge of learning to live with a missing arm. To make that transition easier, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or Darpa, has launched a $55-million project that pools the efforts of prosthetics experts nationwide to create a thought-controlled bionic arm that duplicates the functions of a natural limb.

http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/science/09/05/bionic.arm/index.html


The Living Home


The World Right Now

Just back from CEDIA show, consumer electronics for the very high end of the market – folks who will plunk down $15,000 for a combo DVD/HDTV/iPOD player that controls every media device in the home. What caught my eye here were two things – the first is the use of biological metaphors for home control technology. The second is, in the midst of this testimony to rich consumer self-indulgence, both these products are built to run on the very mass market Windows Media Center Edition platform.

“The World’s First Home Awareness System. Security systems might discourage break-ins, but they can’t guard against breakdowns. With the Home Heartbeat™ system- easy-to-install wireless sensors check the pulse of your home. No technicians, no codes, no third party monitoring or complex manuals are required.

http://www.homeheartbeat.com/HomeHeartBeat/index.htm

“Autonomic Controls Inc.’s MCE-CS Control Server brings the power of Windows Media Center to touch-panels, controls systems, and CE devices.”

http://www.autonomiccontrols.com/MCE%20Server.htm


Towards a Better Couch Potato


Personal Infrastructure

Well, it’s better than technology development driven throught weapons research.

“Hitachi’s scientists are set to develop a brain TV remote controller letting users turn a TV on and off or switch channels by only thinking.”

http://www.technewsworld.com/story/57980.html


Neurons Outside the Brain


Personal Infrastructure

This blog has highlighted gains toward technology interfaces to neurons. This study advances understanding of the action of neurons themselves toward forming memory.

“This time, Ben-Jacob and graduate student Itay Baruchi, who led the study, targeted inhibitory neurons to try to bring some order to their neural network. They mounted the cell culture on a polymer panel studded with electrodes, which enabled Ben-Jacob and Baruchi to monitor the patterns created by firing neurons. All of the cells on the electrode array came from the cortex, the outermost layer of the brain known for its role in memory formation.”

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articleID=0306422B-E7F2-99DF-3809798634B2D416&chanID=sa003


The World Right Now Ticker


The World Right Now

One more for today. Simple and elegant, if selective.

http://www.poodwaddle.com/worldclock.swf


More Bionics


Personal Infrastructure

Another instance of progress through war.

“The thumb and fingers can move and grip just like a human hand and are controlled by the patient’s mind and muscles. It was invented by David Gow and was designed and built by Touch Bionics, which is based in Livingston. The technology has been tested by a number of people, including US soldiers who lost limbs in the Iraq war.”

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/edinburgh_and_east/6901231.stm


RFID Hacking


Personal Infrastructure

I wrote in my book Neurosphere that the war on terror was essentially a war on ourselves. The more we inter-mesh through RFID and other technologies, the more we need to proactively decide whether to war on ourselves or not.

“A typical passive RFID chip costs about a quarter, whereas one with encryption capabilities runs about $5. It’s just not cost-effective for your average office building to invest in secure chips. This leaves most RFIDs vulnerable to cloning or – if the chip has a writable memory area, as many do – data tampering. Chips that track product shipments or expensive equipment, for example, often contain pricing and item information.”

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/14.05/rfid.html


Shades of Digital Angel


Personal Infrastructure

Real time location services. Tracking your stuff, tracking your loved ones, well, don’t you want to know?

“The company’s Hugs and Halo systems are designed to help prevent infants from being removed from a hospital without permission, while RoamAlert is intended to keep patients—such as those with Alzheimer’s—from wandering unattended. The infant and patient-monitoring systems offer other protections as well, such as skin-sensing capabilities that can trigger an alert when a tag is removed from a wearer.”

http://www.rfidjournal.com/article/articleview/3565/1/1/


Tesla Rides Again


Network Infrastructure for the Neurosphere

Although this is also interesting juxtaposed with the previous item, powering without wires is something I think about every business trip when I travel with power cords for PC, phone and iPod, and more if I bring the portable speakers…

“Researchers at MIT have shown that it’s possible to wirelessly power a 60-watt lightbulb sitting about two meters away from a power source.”

http://www.technologyreview.com/Energy/18836/